Is your injury ready for the GAME READY system?

game ready system

 

Game Ready Technology

The Game Ready system and getting you back to competition.

Game Ready’s innovative ACCEL® Technology (Active Compression and Cold Exchange Loop) sets a new standard in injury and post-op treatment, integrating active pneumatic compression and cold therapies in one revolutionary system. The system progressively increases and releases pressure while also rapidly circulating ice water through separate wrap chambers.

Until now, the RICE (Rest–Ice–Compression–Elevation) principles have been used only to passively control symptoms, moderating pain and swelling. But Game Ready® does more. Going beyond static cold and compression applications, ACCEL Technology mimics natural muscle contractions while cooling the tissue, helping the body to proactively aid lymphatic function, encourage cellular oxygen supply, and stimulate tissue repair. That is, it helps accelerate and enhance recovery.

Technology is advancing, and that means your recovery should be too. Don’t be scared of trying new things, and learning to be healthy.

What is the NormaTec?

NormaTec

 

What is the NormaTec?

You have probably seen thousands of pictures of individuals sitting in a chair with giant pants that look like balloons. They claim they are working on recovering their muscles, but what exactly are they using? The Normatec.
NormaTec is the leader in rapid recovery—the system gives a competitive edge to the world’s elite athletes, coaches, and trainers. The NormaTec Recovery Systems are dynamic compression devices designed for recovery. All the systems use NormaTec’s patented PULSE technology to help athletes recover faster between training and after a performance.

So how does the NormaTec actually work?

The systems include a control unit and attachments which go on the legs, arms, or hips. They use compressed air to massage your limbs, mobilize fluid, and speed recovery with the patented NormaTec Pulse Massage Pattern. When you use the systems, you will first experience a pre-inflate cycle, during which the connected attachments are molded to your exact body shape. The session will then begin by compressing your feet, hands, or upper quad (depending on which attachment you are using). Similar to the kneading and stroking done during a massage, each segment of the attachment will first compress in a pulsing manner and then release. This will repeat for each segment of the attachment as the compression pattern works its way up your limb.

The NormaTec is used to help athletes recover as quick as possible to get them ready to train again. Are you interested in trying a NormaTec? Call your local Velocity Sports Performance!

Proper landing technique for basketball players – Snapdown

Last week we went over single leg stability and how to produce and absorb force off of one leg with the single snapdown. This week, we address the double leg snapdown in hopes of understanding better jumping, landing, and breakdown positions to increase more power and reduce the risk of injury. Check it out with Coach Chris Rice

 

 
 

Why Athletes Benefit From Group Training

benefits of group training

 

Why should your athlete participate in group training sessions?

Sports are about who can fail the least, and to get good at failing the least we must fail a lot at first. In a group setting you can fail, and are encouraged to fail as you receive corrections from a coach. Athletes in these types of settings get the added benefit of learning from other athletes and their failures. By learning from other athletes mistakes you avoid making the same errors, and with the extra failure the learning curve increases for each individual.

Training with a group also teaches teamwork and accountability. Most sports are team based sports, and the ability of a team to win isn’t based on one athlete’s abilities. As athletes, we need to be the best we can be, but we need to bring the rest of the team with us. Working within a group setting encourages young athletes to inspire others, and teaches them about leadership. Leadership values are hard to teach in a one-on-one setting because there are no other athletes there to fail with you.

The importance of competing is also emphasized in a group session because the athletes are constantly pushing each other both physically and mentally. Learning to compete is a crucial part of athletics. An athlete needs to have the knowledge of competing in order to compete with an opponent. These athletes first learn how to have healthy competition with their teammates, and then they learn to compete with themselves.

There are many benefits for athletes to participate in group training, and by subjecting your athlete to group sessions you are only benefiting them. Remember to keep the groups at a maximum of about 15 to 1 to make sure your athlete is receiving a good amount of attention. After learning how to work with a group your athlete will then be ready for any small group situations as well!

2 Words For Athletes To Avoid At All Costs

By using negative words like HAVE TO and CAN’T we vocalize our fear of failure. Teaching athletes to keep a positive and growth mindset is important because being an athlete means you will fail multiple times a day, and that’s okay! However, you must learn to fail, and not be afraid of that failure. Here are two words that athletes should avoid using to stay in the right mindset.

HAVE TO– Instead of saying have to, say you WANT TO. When we say, we HAVE TO do something we create a belief that someone is forcing us to do something. For example, when a coach gives an athlete a specific workout, and the athlete asks “do I HAVE TO?” This athlete is creating doubt, and does not have the desire to accomplish the workout or their goals. To have a productive training session change your word choice to WANT TO, and the overall atmosphere and morale of you and your teammates will increase. Have a drive and a WANT to work towards your goals, and not do something because someone is making you do it.

CAN’T-Instead of saying can’t, say not yet! This is the most used, and most hurtful, word to our goals and mindset. When we say, I CAN’T, we are telling our brain that our body will not be able to perform the action. We have put up a mental road block on our path towards success. By changing the outlook, and saying NOT YET to something, we are keeping our path clear to continue towards our goals. Coaches may even respond to you when you say can’t with “not with an attitude like that!” If something seems hard try it anyways because you never know what you are capable of until you try.

Are you having a hard time finishing your training sessions strong? Do you/or your athlete feel defeated before even attempting your session? Watch what you say, and try changing a few words in your training vocabulary. Teaching athletes to keep a positive and growth mindset is important for their mental health, and goals.

Failing is part of life and all sports. When we learn to fail, and learn to overcome that failure we learn to have resilience. When we get knocked down we learn to get back up!

Why Athletes Should Train Every Day

You don’t have to train physically every day, but if you have certain goals you need to be disciplined enough to continually “train” your mind as well. Professional athletes never have an off day because they are consistently working towards their goals both physically and mentally. Training daily can have many benefits for your body, and your mentality. If you want to be a successful athlete, you must be willing to put in the work every single day.

When you take a day off from training you are basically saying that “I’m not working on my goals or me as an athlete today.” You are telling yourself that your goals are not important, and they are ideas or things that would be cool if you accomplished them. If you have a goal you want to reach you must work for it every day not just physically, but mentally and emotionally. When you choose to not train you’re pushing your goals further away, and you develop excuses later that turn into habits.

Not every athlete can train every day due to different circumstances, and that is understandable. However, when taking a “rest” day you need to take the proper steps to continually grow as an athlete. Don’t’ be afraid to work towards your goals every day.

7 TRX Moves to Build Upper-Body Strength

The TRX Suspension System is great for providing exercises that are safe, functional and useful in preventing and recovering from injury. Essential to any strength-training program, an athlete uses their own bodyweight — adjusting resistance as needed — in order to target multiple muscle groups at once. The following exercises are just a few examples of how you can use TRX in your training. It is important to note that resistance is added by stepping closer to the TRX point-of-attachment, and reduced by stepping away. The row is a traditional exercise that targets the upper back and shoulder muscles. When compared to a traditional row, the TRX row is different in that it requires increased core stabilization.

How To: Begin with arms fully extended, pull elbows straight back and squeeze the shoulder blades together. Keep the core tight, and do not allow the hips to rise or fall. A great exercise for shoulder stability, the TRX Y targets the trapezius, deltoids and upper rotator cuff muscles.

How To: Bring straight arms up into a Y shape; be sure to point thumbs back. Keep the core tight, and body straight. The TRX T is another great exercise to target the upper back, including the rhomboids and rotator cuff muscles.

How To: Palms should be facing forward with thumbs pointed upward. While keeping arms straight, bring arms back into a T shape, contracting the upper back to bring the shoulder blades together. Keep the core tight, and body straight. The TRX A targets the lats, and other rotator cuff muscles. You can

How To: With palms facing forward, pull straight arms down to the sides in an A shape. Keep the core tight, and body straight. The TRX Tricep Extension targets the core and triceps, while also increasing shoulder stability.

How To: Begin face down, arms straight overhead, bent to 90 degrees with the palms facing upward. Extend the arms while maintaining an engaged core. A play on the traditional bicep curl, the TRX Bicep Curl is a great exercise to target the core and biceps.

How To: Begin with arms extended, as with the row, but palms facing upward. Without allowing the elbows to come close to the body, pull handles toward the shoulders. Keep the core engaged. The TRX Push Up Targets the pectoral muscles and anterior shoulder muscles. This exercise is great for shoulder and core stability.

How To: Begin face down in push up position, arms extended. Lower chest to handles, keeping the elbows close to the body, and then push handles away from the body until original position is reached. Do not allow the hips to rise or fall.Do you want to learn new ways to get stronger? Come find out how with the elite coaches at VSP South Bay. VSP South Bay makes athletes better. Click below to learn more about our programs and free trial.

10-Minute Dynamic Warm-up for Any Workout

One way to set yourself up for workout greatness is by employing a dynamic warm-up. The warm-up below will prepare your body (and mind) for the advanced and technical moves to come. Additionally, taking the time to warm your muscles will help keep you injury free and in the game.

Dynamic Warm-Up

Before your workout, take ten minutes to perform the following exercises:

  • Up Dog/Down Dog
  • 20 Yard and Back Jog
  • 10 Leg Swings
  • 20 Yard Back Pedal and Back
  • 5 Lunges (per leg)
  • 20 Yard Skip Backward
  • 10 Push-Ups
  • 5 Groiner Stretches (per leg)
  • 20 Yard Shuffle and Back
  • 5 Lateral Lunges (per leg)
  • 20 Yard Carioca and Back
  • 10 Supine Straight Leg High Kicks
  • 10 Bridges
  • 10 Supine Leg Swings
  • 20 Yard Broad Jump
  • 10 Yard Single Leg Broad Jump (per leg)
  • 5 Burpees and Sprint 20 Yards
  • 5 Single Leg Burpees (left leg) then sprint 20 yards
  • 5 Single Leg Burpees (right leg) and sprint 20 yards
  • 5 Standing Knee Pulls (per leg)

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